Pickling Time and Chunking Kale

koolkosherkitchen

A distressed mother barges into a Rabbi’s study:

“Rabbi, my son has gone meshuge (crazy)!”

“Calm down, lady, have you taken him to a specialist? What makes you think that?”

“Specialist-shmeshalist! Who needs specialists? I am a mother, I know!”

“But, dear lady, what does he do?”

“Oy, Rabbi, he eats pigs and dances with girls!”

“Listen,” – says the Rabbi with a sigh, – “If it were the other way around, that is, if he were dancing with pigs and eating girls, you would have a cause to worry. As it is, he is young and is simply going through a stage.”

Related image

Unfortunately, even the great Salvador Dali could not come up with a way of pickling time or preserving it in any other way. Therefore, we’ll have to listen to the Rabbi and do it “the other way around.” We’ll pickle kale, and we’ll let a…

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“All You Need Is Love” – Zoodles, Part 3. Toodles.

koolkosherkitchen

You’ve heard all kinds of jokes about Jewish Time. It is tacitly assumed that “standard Jewish time” is about thirty minutes later than regular time. For instance, if an invitation is issued for, say, three o’clock in the afternoon, it’s a good idea to clarify whether you are expected there on time or on standard Jewish time, otherwise you risk catching your hosts still putting on finishing touches. King Solomon, the wisest man on Earth, remarked, “That which has been is that which will be, And that which has been done is that which will be done. There is nothing new under the sun” (Koheles, Chapter 1). Throughout the ages, philosophers of many different cultures interpreted this statement as either the Oedipal vision of fate – what will be, shall be, no matter what we do – or the linear ascent in pursuit of – well, whatever one…

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Pink Stuffed Potatoes

Cooking Up The Pantry

This is what happens when I bake too many potatoes the night before!

A great way of sneaking some more veg into the kids and in a house full of males I need some pink in my life!

Serves 4-6 depending on the size of your potatoes.

Ingredients

4 medium to large potatoes, baked and cooled

30g butter

1 small onion, finely diced

230g beetroot, peeled and grated

100g gruyere cheese, finely grated plus a little to top

1 teaspoon fresh parsley, chopped

Freshly ground pepper

Method

Preheat the oven to 180 degrees Centigrade. Line a baking tray with baking parchment.

Half the potatoes, scooop out the flesh, leaving the skin intact. Place the cooked potato in a large bowl.

In a large frying pan, heat the butter over a medium heat and add the onion. Cook for 5-7 minutes until it begins to soften.

Add the beetroot to the…

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Skewers for a party

Cooking Without Limits

GAB_4796_res_mix

In our family we love to grill the meat, any meat and any time, and of course any vegetables. When you make skewers with different ingredients you have plenty possibilities. Vegetarian or not, they are the best when you have a party or you are feeding a crowd.

My little one loves to make them. Sometime he uses all the vegetables and I am left only with meat to put on my skewers, so we made a plan to share and help each other.

You need always fresh vegetables and quality meat. You can marinate the meat or just use it as it is.

Your vegetables should always compliment the flavors of the meat and should take the same amount to cook.

Ingredients:

  • 1 zucchini
  • 3 big tomatoes
  • 3 big red onions
  • 2 red peppers
  • 1 white eggplant
  • 2 chicken breast
  • 250g pork

Directions:

Cut the vegetables and meat in…

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Pyshka – Sweet Roll and a Baby Kitten

koolkosherkitchen

Pyshka is a sweet roll, baked or deep-fried, with or without filling, made with yeast or as a quick bread, i.e. yeast-less. Sort of a Russian doughnut with a Polish name (most sources derive the name from Polish pączek  – sweet roll). Another theory attributes the name to Russian pykchat’ which is archaic for deep-frying, but since the method of deep-frying was not discovered in Russia until 1835 (www.pekari.ru), while pyshki had been frequent already on Ivan the Terrible’s table three hundred years earlier, as recorded in the palace kitchen accounts, this one does not hold water. Neither does the legend about a Dutch captain Gregory Hanson (is that a Dutch name? Curious!) who never let a sweet roll out of his hand until one day, during a violent storm, the waters were so turbulent that he had to grab the wheel with both hands, so he pinned the…

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Unfair Trade: Muffins for Tobacco

koolkosherkitchen

Are muffins bread? Are they cakes? Are they supposed to be eaten for breakfast, lunch, snack, dessert, or all of the above?

cupcakes_vs_muffins

Are muffins really cupcakes without frosting? Thomas Jefferson thought so, and called muffins “a luxury to us.” Today, you can get a recipe for Monticello Muffins at www.monticello.org.  But those are not American muffins, tall, soft inside, but with a crispy crust. They are English muffins, yeast-based and flat. Still, in the colonies, they were a novelty and a luxury.  In England, though, they probably arrived from Wells together with the most miserly and avaricious, as well as the most unlikely king who won the throne by defeating King Richard III at the Battle of Bosworth Field. Poor Richard, much maligned in history, hadn’t been able to trade his kingdom for a horse and ended up forfeiting the crown together with life.

Henry Tudor, or Harri Tudur

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