Cucumber and poppy seed salad

Ten More Bites

Cucumber and poppy seed salad

This salad of cucumber and red chilli tossed in a zingy-sweet dressing takes minutes to prepare.

I like to give it a little time in the fridge – half an hour is enough – for the cucumber to get cool and crisp, and the chilli heat to work its way into the dressing.

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Baked potatoes in the oven

Cooking Without Limits

GAB_3233_res_mix

I love to bake unpeeled potatoes in the oven. Crispy on the outside and soft in the middle, you get a perfect baked potato served cracked open and still steaming. You can have it with butter and salt, cheese, baked beans or chili sauce. Any filling is good, vegetarian or not.

You can baked them when you come from work. Put some potatoes in the oven and then just carry on with your after work routine.

The best potatoes for baking in the oven are Russets. The skin is thicker and the interior is starchy.

Ingredients:

  • Russet potatoes (the same size)
  • Salt
  • Fresh ground pepper

Instructions:

Heat the oven at 200 degrees C. Turn on the oven while you are washing the potatoes. Sprinkle salt and pepper on each potato. Prick the potatoes in a few places with a fork. Bake the potatoes on the oven rack or place them…

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Zucchini Caviar from Beyond the Sea

koolkosherkitchen

Tzar Ivan the Terrible was a cruel tyrant. Everybody knows that. And just like many things that “everybody knows” and thus nobody questions, the sobriquet “Terrible” should be taken with a grain of salt. Since we are in the middle of Pesach (Passover), I recommend Kosher for Passover Red Sea Salt.

Ilya Yefimovich Repin (1844 - 1930)  Ivan the Terrible and His Son Ivan on November 16th, 1581  Oil on canvas, 1885  199.5 × 254 cm (78.54 × 100 in)  State Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow,  Russia

True, he did accidentally kill his son Ivan Ivanovich, but the kid had the temerity to argue with dad! You gotta have respect for your elders! However, look at the other European monarchs, his contemporaries: Henry VIII used to chop off his wives’ heads left and right, presumably considering it much cheaper than suing for divorce (I know, the Pope wouldn’t grant him a divorce, so he eventually became his own Pope – the original DIY guy). Catherine de Medici killed close to 30,000 Huguenots during the Night of St Bartholomew, and that was no accident!

Fast forward four hundred…

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Let Them Eat… Potatoes!

koolkosherkitchen

From the Inca Empire to Queen Marie Antoinette of France, to the Russian patissiers (pastry chefs), traveled a simple vegetable, to be transformed into a delectable pastry.

inca_king

Here is this civilization which, starting in the early 13th century, in three hundred years grew into an immense empire and, by the time it was conquered by the Spanish, occupied most of South America. According to historical records, it has spread somewhat by conquest, but mostly by peaceful assimilation. The Incas had an elaborate system of religion, culture, and societal structure, yet to the European eyes, they were missing the staples of civilization: the wheel and the animals to drag wheeled vehicles, the metals, such as iron and steel, and, most importantly, the literacy. No wonder Europeans considered them savages, but objectively, “the Incas were still able to construct one of the greatest imperial states in human history” (McEwan, 2006).

moche_pottery

Lacking metals…

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Vinaigrette – a Russian Winter Salad

koolkosherkitchen

He is called Father Frost or General Frost. He lives in Russia, and he could be very cruel, especially to those who do not show proper respect to him. He has defeated many invaders, from the khans, to Napoleon, to Nazi Germany. He likes to decorate fields and forests, covering them in pristine snow and sparkling ice. And he is not gentle to those who have no means to keep warm and eat well.

Marc Chagal’s painting Over Vitebsk depicts just such a person, a wondering Jew, poorly equipped to travel on foot through towns and villages covered in snow. He is disproportionally huge, symbolizing the entire Jewish population of 19th century Russia, persecuted and destitute, with no place to call their own. Yet, in the middle of merciless Russian winter, the warmth of Chanukkah lights gave them a glimmer of hope.

tumblr_lwmhmitqwg1qiyrilo1_1280(Hanukkah, by Arthur Szyk 1948, collection of…

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