Writing Workshop…Top Tips

estherchiltonblog

Now for the ninth instalment in my writing workshop series. I’ve covered the short storyendingas well as theopening. I’ve guided you throughdialogueand focused on the importance of taking time to do thingsproperly. I’ve also given you acompetitionsrefresher and some general advice on the art of theshort story. The seventh instalment was about tips on writinghumorous piecesand last week helped you with generating ideas. This week turns to the art of copywriting:

A Copywriting Career

 I hadn’t ever thought about becoming a copywriter. I’d had a love affair with article, short story, competition and filler writing for years, but the idea of becoming a copywriter was non-existent. My back therapist thought otherwise.

“You write, don’t you?” she said, cracking my back into place one day. “I need someone to provide the copy for my leaflets. Would…

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WAIWAI MOVES HOUSE

thekitchensgarden

Before I even fed him yesterday Wai had decided he was moving house. For the last few days I had opened the gate between him and Tima and Tane the Kune Kune couple and the kune kune had come across chatting and complaining but Wai had decided he had no time for that kind of pig and was leaving the barn to find other more comfortable and secluded quarters.  

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5 Reasons to Make and Use Flash Cards

Uninspired Writers

Morning writers, I hope you are all well!

My blog post today focuses on what I’m calling ‘Flash Cards’ and some reasons why I think it’s beneficial to make and use them while writing a novel. As with any advice, this is one person’s opinion and may not be for you, but personally I have found flash cards immeasurably useful. I touched on these slightly in my post about beating the writer’s slump, but would like to go in more depth today.

By flash cards, I mean a lot of cards (I used revision cards, you can buy them in most stationary stores, or make your own) each with a scene from your novel written on it. It only needs to be brief. Mine included a basic ‘what happens in this scene?” sentence, for example “police investigate murder scene.” I also included the location of the scene…

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