10 Memorable Cooking Tips We Learned From Our Grandmothers

960e42910fe4e458_PS16_D1_Stills_5123.jpg
No matter how many cooking tips we learn from the internet or Food Network, there’s one source of inspiration that can never be replaced: our grandmothers. In honor of Mother’s Day, we’re taking a look back at some of the best cooking tips we’ve learned from our precious grandmas that we continue to use on a regular basis and that you can, too. Spoiler alert: there’s no kale involved.

1. Always use real butter. “Use butter. Never, ever use a substitute . . . because butter is just better. On an unrelated note: I’m from the South.” — Hilary White, editor, Love & Sex and Smart Living

2. Cook beans in bacon fat. “The best way to cook any kind of bean: Saute a piece of bacon. Remove the bacon slice (and eat it). Use the fat along with a pat of butter to saute some diced onions. Add the beans and water along with some freshly ground pepper. Salt once the beans are fork tender. Seriously, the bacon-fat-butter combo is the secret to incredible-tasting beans. Also, serve the beans like a soup in their pot liquor. It’s heaven.” — Anna Monette Roberts, editor, Food

3. There’s no shame in turning to frozen meals. “Some nights, it’s OK to just heat up some Stouffer’s Fettuccine Alfredo. The truth is that this was actually every night with her. Cooking was ‘against her religion.'” — Stacy Hersher, director, Social & Partnerships

4. Always think about making enough food to save for later. “Make enough for leftovers.” — Macy Williams, assistant editor, Shop

5. Don’t be afraid to change up a recipe. “Follow a recipe exactly the first time. Then if it’s good but needs tweaking, experiment with changes after it’s been evaluated (tasted) as it was intended by its creator.” — Tara Block, content director, Living

6. Buy the cheaper meat. “My Mexican grandma was always in the kitchen making something. Always. Even if she was in the living room, she had something going on the stove. My favorite recipe from her is what we call ‘Grandma Tacos,’ which are shredded pork tacos. You just put a pork shoulder (the cheaper the better, she insisted, because cheaper meant more fat and thus more flavor) in a slow cooker with a packet of Lipton’s onion soup mix and a can of Coke. (My grandma was a serious home cook who made most things from scratch, but this is also a total 1950s convenience recipe). After several hours, it shreds up, and you just top it off with homemade guacamole (frying your tortillas to make a shell is optional but delicious). The funny thing is, my sisters and I all love this recipe and make it regularly, but we all agree: it doesn’t taste quite like Grandma’s. For starters, she never used a slow cooker; she always did it on the stove, and we know, we just know — there was some kind of secret she didn’t tell us. Either that, or she was just that incredible. Which we’re also certain of.” — Shannon Vestal Robson, director

7. Save pasta water. “Every good cook knows that saving pasta water is an important step in achieving the perfect sauce, and it’s something I learned a long time ago. My Italian grandmother taught my mom, who then taught me, and it’s one of my most-loved Italian cooking tips.” — Erin Cullum, assistant editor, Food

8. Keep family recipes alive. “There’s no cookbook more valuable than the one you’ll have with your family’s recipes. It’s a way to remember your roots and relive happy memories.” — Angela Elias, content director, Living

9. Write helpful notes in your cookbooks. “Make notes in cookbooks to keep track.” — TB

10. Never use a dull knife. “I learned to love cooking with my other grandma. Her most practical tip is that the most dangerous thing in the kitchen is a dull knife.”

— SH Image Source: POPSUGAR Photography / Sheila Gim

Baby sleep tips

Every parent of a newborn will inevitably deal with many sleepless nights. Babies, of course, have many needs, and when they awake in the night they will cry for their mothers. One of your most important tasks as a parent is to establish good sleeping habits in your child. Every baby must go through a transition where he adjusts from sleeping with his mother to sleeping on his own. This is a natural transition of course, and takes some time, but there are things you can do to expedite the process. Not only will this help your child develop better sleep habits, it will allow you to get some much needed rest.

Many baby sleep tips exist, and every parent would be well advised to research many different baby sleep tips. It is important to keep in mind, however, that no baby sleep tip should be considered hard and fast rules. As a parent, your instincts know best, and when you are in doubt in regards to baby sleep tips remind yourself of this fact. Many first time parents experience insecurity in terms of whether their decisions and strategies are correct, and while you shouldn’t be uninformed, you should always view baby sleep tips through the lens of your own parental instincts.

Now, one thing you should consider when trying to get your newborn to sleep better at night is what his feeding habits are. Oftentimes the child will be active and otherwise busy during the day, and won’t be doing a lot of feeding. The problem with this, of course, is that he will then wake you repeatedly thought the night for feedings. A good technique, then, for getting your baby to sleep better at night is to “tank up” during the day. Try feeding every three hours during the day. This will not only ensure that you child’s appetite is satisfied for the night, but will create an important association: you want your child to associate feeding with the daytime. If your child does wake up in the night for a feeding, try to get him to do one full feeding the first time he wakes up. If you don’t do this, you encourage him to “snack” throughout the night – i.e. wake you up every couple hours.

Again, it is important to understand these baby feeding tips should not be taken as hard and fast rules, but rather as guidance. In a general way, you want to create both daytime and sleep associations for your child. You want him to associate feeding and play with something that happens during the day, and lullabies and baths as something that happens at night, before bed. By doing this you ease the transition between sleep and wakefulness, which is the ultimate goal in terms of putting your child to bed easily. If, however, your child doesn’t want to feed every three hours, don’t force him. Similarly, don’t force a full feeding when you wake him at night. Rather, think of the bigger picture: by creating general habits and associations for your child, you will ensure a hasty and healthy sleep development.

The Worst Case Scenario: How to Handle Family Health Emergencies – Optimistic Mommy

As a parent, it’s inevitable your kids will have accidents and require medical attention. But, in serious emergencies, it’s vital you know exactly how to handle the situation as, in severe cases, your initial actions could mean the difference between life and death. Not only will you have to get to your destination quickly, you […]

Source: The Worst Case Scenario: How to Handle Family Health Emergencies – Optimistic Mommy

TJ’s Household Haiku

Life is too short to drink bad wine

Tree Cathedral Standing here in the soft grass I took this picture while a gentle breeze gave the slightest ripple of movement in the treetops. Taken in spring in Versailles

The insular trees

Whispering conspiritors

My! How very arch!

Prompt words – “Arch and Tree”

Hi all!

Back again after a weeks absence due to the vicissitudes of life. Many thanks for the comments and the contributions as a result of the prompts. Here is a windup of the Haikus from the last challenge

Floridaborne has produced let the cat out of the bag here.

https://rantingalong.wordpress.com/2017/04/30/tjs-household-haiku-challenge-spring-cold/

Lady Lee Manila has two lovely contrasting images to go with the great haiku.

https://ladyleemanilablog.wordpress.com/2017/04/30/tjs-household-haiku-challenge-spring-and-cold/

Judy Martin has a different takes on the prompt words “Spring and Cold”

https://www.edwinasepisodes.com/tjs-household-haiku-challenge-spring-cold/

Tucked Into a Corner has a wonderfully image filled trilogy of haiku here.

https://tuckedintoacorner.wordpress.com/2017/04/29/spring-cold-perfume/

Ritu has brightened our day with this haiku!

https://butismileanyway.com/2017/04/30/tjs-household-haiku-challenge-spring-cold/

Annette Rochelle Aben has sees…

View original post 141 more words